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Details

  • Start: In the lay-by at the Clavering Christian Centre on Stortford Road GR 474 318
  • End: In the lay-by at the Clavering Christian Centre on Stortford Road GR 474 318
  • Country: England
  • County: Essex
  • Type: Country
  • Nearest pub: OS Explorer 194 Hertford and Bishop’s Stortford
  • Ordnance Survey: There are pubs in Clavering (Fox and Hounds and The Cricketers) along the B1038 and there is a supermarket on Stortford Road
  • Difficulty: Medium
Google Map

Description

The ancient name of Clavering is derived from Clauelinga, meaning the place where the clover grows. Today, the village remains an idyllic location for a countryside walk words and pictures by Charlotte Fellingham

Walk in Clavering, where clover grows


The ancient name of Clavering is derived from Clauelinga, meaning the place where the clover grows. Today, the village remains an idyllic location for a countryside walk
words and pictures by Charlotte Fellingham



FACTFILE


Distance: 6 miles / 10 km / 3 hours


Terrain: There are livestock in some of the fields, so please make sure any dogs are kept on leads.


Start / Parking: In the lay-by at the Clavering Christian Centre on Stortford Road GR 474 318


Map: OS Explorer 194 Hertford and Bishops Stortford


Refreshments: There are pubs in Clavering (Fox and Hounds and The Cricketers) along the B1038 and there is a supermarket on Stortford Road


Tourist Information Centre:
1 Market Place
Market Square
Saffron Walden
Essex CB10 1HR
01799 524002


Places to visit: Bishops Stortford and its historic market town centre.


Step 1
Walk north up Stortford Road and turn right at the T-junction. Just before the 40 speed limit sign, cross the road, nip through a gap in the trees and cross a bridge over the River Stort, which springs in to life west of Clavering. Turn left then right up the byway beside Colehills Close. Follow the lane up hill until it plateaus alongside the cropped fields. Take the first path on the left across the fields and alongside the telegraph wires. At the hedge, dive across to the left-hand side. Keep ahead following the path to the disused windmill. This mill (North Mill) was built in 1811 for milling corn but has been converted to residential use. Turn left at the road, then right at the junction, past another old mill (South Mill). This one is a little older, built in 1757. Just past Mill End House, turn left on to a bridleway alongside a stream. Follow this all the way to the road.


Step 2
Turn right, at a crossroads of footpaths meeting the road, by Deers; turn right, taking the footpath that follows the driveway of Deers, avoiding the cattle grid by going through the gate to the side. The name of the property, Deers, has remained unchanged since 1537. At the ponds, continue ahead, off the driveway, and then turn right through the field gate before the bridge, following the path round to the left. Keep ahead, going through the gap in the hedge and continue on a field edge. At the end of the field, dip down to the stream and cross a stile. Continue ahead, more or less following the stream to go through a gate, across another sheep field and over a stile and bridge to join a lane. Turn left to the road and then right along the road for a short way. Before Yew Tree Farm, a 16th century farmhouse, turn left onto a bridleway called Cakebreads Lane. Look back from the woods at the top of the bridleway and youll see the disused windmill in the distance, also look out for deer in the pasture and by the edge of Oxbury Wood, which is home to many ancient woodland plants. Continue ahead through the woodland, the path can be quite churned up with mud, and continue on in to Hertfordshire. Once out of the woods, turn left along a field edge with the wood on your left.

Step 3
As the hedge finishes on your left, five paths converge. Turn left and continue across the field towards the top of Beeches Wood. Once across the field, keep ahead with the wood on your right. Go across the next field, over a bridge and turn right alongside a hedge and back in to Essex. As the path kinks to the right by a big tree and an opening into another field, turn left and go straight across the field. Once on the other side, turn right along the hedgerow. At the end of the field, cross the ditch and turn left so the ditch is on the left. Follow the dog leg around the field edge and through a kissing gate. Follow the fenced in path then go over a stile and continue in a straight line, through kissing gates, to the road.


Step 4
Turn right, then left. Take the first footpath on the left, over a stile. Follow the hedge to another stile. Turn left along the gravel path and go over another stile. Keep in the field, at the bottom, climb another stile into a field. Keep ahead, across the crop towards the track on the other side. Follow the track, at a stile on the right cross over into a field and continue to the road by Curles Manor, which dates from the 15th century. Turn left at the road and follow it back round in to Clavering.




About Open Access


Open Access Land means that where you see this symbol you can walk without sticking to the mapped
paths. For more information on Open
Access and the right to roam visit
www.openaccess.gov.uk or call
0845 100 3290


Each month Essex County Councils Public Rights of Way team provide
Essex Life with a walk in the county. Walking, riding and cycling leaflets
are available to download from
www.essex.gov.uk

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